TRC Calls to Action

Truth and Reconciliation Commission Calls to Action, we, through The Venue, aim to “acknowledge, learn and amplify” Indigenous voices and address the following: 

 

53. iv: “Promote public dialogue, public/private partnerships, and public initiatives for reconciliation”.  Once in our building, the HRPAF plans to be a place for critical, thought provoking, art that will advance the public’s appreciation of the arts.   As events present themselves, initiatives that promote dialogue about our shared colonial past and present colonial systems and structures will be encouraged in the spirit of reconciliation.

 

63. iii: “building student capacity for intercultural understanding, empathy, and mutual respect”.  Through accessibility, inclusion and respect, it is the hope of the HRPAF that youth projects undertaken in our space will aim to build intercultural understanding, empathy and mutual respect. 

 

83. “... a strategy for Indigenous and non-Indigenous artists to undertake collaborative projects and produce works that contribute to the reconciliation process”. One of the goals of the HRPAF is to provide opportunities for collaboration. 

 

92.i:  “Commit to meaningful consultation, building respectful relationships, and obtaining the free, prior, and informed consent of Indigenous peoples before proceeding with….. Projects”.  The HRPAF believes strongly that the role of a predominately settler community is to acknowledge, learn and amplify.  Meaningful intercultural relationships can only be obtained through respectful consultation and involvement with the Indigenous communities in and around High River.

Reconciliation Project of 2021

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Reconciliation, by definition, means “the restoration of friendly relations.” That is exactly what Amanda Tanner, local fibre artist and volunteer, feels as well.
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Unity of Hearts by Mary Telfer
Unity of Hearts by Mary Telfer

There are many references from Baha'i prayers that I call on, for unity, unity of hearts. I saw the stylized heart shape as a symbol, and a heart within a heart to represent all of humanity being united with each other. We are all united as human beings, our lives like weavings: interlacing and connecting. Each life is like a warp, and the pathways we follow are like the wefts: threads we choose, colour, texture and pattern.

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Flower of Hope, Healing and Reconciliation by Verena Wardley
Flower of Hope, Healing and Reconciliation by Verena Wardley
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Friendship by D.G.
Friendship by D.G.
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Possibilities for the Future by Amanda Tanner
Possibilities for the Future by Amanda Tanner

I wove this grass basket of hope for the children. I harvested the grass from George Lane Memorial Park. It contains the possibilities for the future.

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untitled by Sylvia Jenkins
untitled by Sylvia Jenkins

Sylvia made these feathers with the names of her Cree grandparents and relatives. She made the braid and macrame pieces for this visual honouring.

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untitled by Jacqui Wolffe
untitled by Jacqui Wolffe

The center represents the children from different bands. White is the snow they ran and walked through to get home. Orange corners are the families waiting for them. Blue border is the endless sky that represents hope.

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Love Knows No Bounds by Mary
Love Knows No Bounds by Mary
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Treaty Seven Pennants by Cheryl Baile
Treaty Seven Pennants by Cheryl Baile

The Treaty Seven pennants were created to show respect for all the Indigenous people that live and have lived on the lands encompassed by Treaty Seven. Turquoise was chosen as it is the complement to orange and the embroidered motifs chosen are readily recognized by most people as representative of aspects of Indigenous culture.

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Wood Cuts
Wood Cuts

by Robyn Tanner, Clara Sunwalk - White Weasel Woman, Ruby Sunwalk - Long Time River, Muriel Blackkettle - Pipe Woman, Summer Desabrais, Jason Sunwalk - Eagle Feather, Amurah Bird - Different Bird Woman Paintings by children that acknowledge and honour Treaty 7 land, the children of residential schools and Blackfoot culture.

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Navajo Design by A.M.
Navajo Design by A.M.
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Little Baskets of Hope & Grass Spoke Circle Weavings
Little Baskets of Hope & Grass Spoke Circle Weavings

Participants in the Reconciliation Sharing Circle in George Lane Memorial Park throughout the Summer of 2021. The yarns were collected and donated and the grass came from the park. Clara Sunwalk - White Weasle Woman, Ruby Sunwalk - Long Time River, Muriel Blackkettle - Pipe Woman, Jason Sunwalk - Eagle Feather, Sara Mayne, Joanne Harris, Marvey Gallagher, Elaine Schow, Amanda Tanner, (Reconciliation Sharing Circle)

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A Child's Dream...to be Forever Cherished by Shirley Hill
A Child's Dream...to be Forever Cherished by Shirley Hill

This art piece is dedicated to all Residential School Survivors across Turtle Island (North America), who have endured pain and suffering while attending these schools (not schools, more like prisons). The doves represent the children being free, to return and be embraced by the love of Creator/Great Spirit. Now is time to share the TRUTH of Canada's history and honour the indigenous peoples who are healing, we are healing...together.

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Moccasins by Shirley Froese
Moccasins by Shirley Froese

Many years ago I learned to make moccasins and mukluks from a Cree woman in Saskatchewan.

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The Fleating Wolf by Ashley Gaboury
The Fleating Wolf by Ashley Gaboury

"The Fleeting Wolf" was created from discarded items that otherwise would have been thrown away. It is meant to reflect loss of life not only from our ecosystems but personal and communal loss. The wolf reminds us of the importance of family and is a symbol of both strength and healing.

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Sunflower Block by Jillian G
Sunflower Block by Jillian G

This sunflower block was made to inspire hope within communities. May we be like the sunflower and turn towards all that is good.

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Crow Children - Valerie McLenahan
Crow Children - Valerie McLenahan

The story of one is the story of all. I believe in communities connecting, sharing and unifying as one people of the earth. The truth of the residential schools has touched my heart as it has touched many others. Crow children enjoying a peaceful moment is a calming picture. Kids being kids is simply a delight.

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Friendship by M.C.
Friendship by M.C.
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Bison Kids - Valerie McLenahan
Bison Kids - Valerie McLenahan

My paintings depict spirits of the ancestors watching over young ones playing, sharing and learning as a reminder that we, the adults of the world, are responsible to care for the children – all of the children on this earth. Every child has the right to security, safety and belonging to grow into healthy, whole human beings. Bison kids frolicking with friends is a pleasure to see.

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Remembrance, Healing, Community by Christa Dainton
Remembrance, Healing, Community by Christa Dainton

Remembrance - Create a symbolic wreath-like weaving for the top of the pieces. Healing - Weave small lengths of leaf coloured overshot pattern, drawn in at color changes to represent leaves. The leaves of the Medicine Tree that once grew outside of town. Community - Loose threads are tied together but left floating, as we listen to and learn from each other’s stories we grow together as a community. Materials - acrylic punch needle yarn woven on a 4 Harness loom

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Childre's Slippers by Lori and Anna Koehler
Childre's Slippers by Lori and Anna Koehler

Knitted slippers made to represent the children taken from their homes to attend residential schools. Made by a mother and daughter, this project also represents the bonds of love and learning that were broken and continue to be challenged by intergenerational trauma.

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Crochet Eagle Feathers by Penny Hajdu
Crochet Eagle Feathers by Penny Hajdu

The five eagle feathers crocheted from handspun wool yarn represent the five beautiful Indigenous youth and children who participated in the making and installation of this art project. Their strength, joy and dignity touched the hearts of all who participated in this project.

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Missing Child by Marvey Gallagher
Missing Child by Marvey Gallagher

The slippers of a child who attended Residential School

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Unity Weaving by Marvey Gallagher
Unity Weaving by Marvey Gallagher

Our lives are all intertwined, just as are the threads in Unity Weaving

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MMIWG2S Vest
MMIWG2S Vest

Shirley found the base vest of this garment at a thrift shop. She was attracted to the beauty of the macrame technique it was created by. She gave it to me and asked if I could include it somehow in the installation. I knew right away it would represent the Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women, Girls and Two-Spirit People. I used a combination of yarns and fabric strips to transform the macrame vest. My friend Sylvia Jenkins made me the fabric embroidered feather to hang on it.

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MMIWG2S Feather
MMIWG2S Feather

Shirley found the base vest of this garment at a thrift shop. She was attracted to the beauty of the macrame technique it was created by. She gave it to me and asked if I could include it somehow in the installation. I knew right away it would represent the Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women, Girls and Two-Spirit People. I used a combination of yarns and fabric strips to transform the macrame vest. My friend Sylvia Jenkins made me the fabric embroidered feather to hang on it.

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Metis Sash by Penny Hajdu
Metis Sash by Penny Hajdu

Unlike the traditional sashes, which were finger woven, I wove the two sashes on a loom using a twill structure. The traditional colours were used for the warp, with the addition of orange, the colour signifying children of residential schools, for either selvedge and for the weft. The sashes are dedicated to my friend, Frances, who like the sashes on the posts, wraps her arms around everyone and holds them tight.

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We are all connected by Carol Balogh
We are all connected by Carol Balogh

We are the leaves, each independently beautiful, but when we come together as a community, we are nourished to become much greater than we truly are. I was inspired by this collaborative community project of reconciliation. My involvement with the High River Handicrafts Guild, my knitting fibre community and friends of my High River home truly enrich my life. This was an opportunity for me to contribute in a meaningful way to help build a collective hope for the future.

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Honouring the Children by Sharon Ladd
Honouring the Children by Sharon Ladd

Each mark was made for each child. I wanted this piece to be happy, full of bright colours. I wanted it to be painted like a child might paint. The forest of trees is a safe place as Mother Nature always is. It is a symbol for all the little ones dancing, in love with life. Healing can be messy. Love always guides us through.

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